Tag Archives: robeson

Robeson adoption rate “less than half” of pre-distemper levels

The Robeson County pound killed 1,035 pets during the months of March, April and May 2012 because of a distemper outbreak (which was at least the third large distemper outbreak there in a little more than a year), and now adoptions are less than half of what they were before the outbreak and the kill rate has “barely decreased,” according to an article in The Robesonian.

The shelter reopened on May 23 after being closed since Feb. 29. In June and July combined, 1,001 dogs and cats were euthanized, 152 animals were adopted or rescued and 35 pets were reclaimed by their owners — an average survival rate of 16.5 percent for dogs and 9.5 percent for cats. August statistics were not available for this story.

Oh, but rest assured, it’s not their fault! Former director Lori Baxter (now employed blaming others for the failure of the Sampson County pound) and former adoption coordinator Sara Hatchell stole the pound’s “customers,” (i.e. rescue groups) when they left to take jobs at other pounds, according to Robeson County Health Director Bill Smith. “It’s much the same as any employee who leaves an employer, they sometimes take customers with them,” Smith said. “… Somebody else gained, and we lost.”

(Meanwhile, Robeson pound’s adoption coordinator Wanda Strickland might not be endearing herself so much to the rescuers who do choose to work with her.)

Actually, it’s pretty nice of Smith not to blame Baxter for the distemper outbreaks to begin with, since they happened during her tenure as manager (as did a “dip” in adoption rates and a spike in kill rates, despite ballyhoo about how she “turned the shelter around”). But wait, as her boss, Smith is probably the one who holds the purse strings, so it may have been his decision not to administer vaccinations upon intake, which are “vital lifesaving tools that must be used as part of a preventive shelter healthcare program.”

Smith also assigns some blame for his shelter’s failure to … wait for it … “poor treatment by county residents of their animals.” The Irresponsible Public! But again, wait … who is it that interim manager Bryon Lashley says will soon be coming in greater numbers to adopt and are currently bringing “donations of puppy food, dog food, cat food and toys coming in and helping us out”? The article says it’s local residents … yes, the Irresponsible Public to the rescue again.

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Filed under "irresponsible public", Distemper, Robeson County

Down the memory hole in Sampson County

A couple of weeks ago, Lori Baxter, the interim director of the Sampson County pound, vowed to bury that facility’s gas chamber. Well someday, maybe, after she figures out another way to kill the animals. Because if you people don’t come take all the animals out, you will force her to kill them because they are taking up the precious space in her shelter:

Baxter needs space

The other day I visited the Sampson pound’s Facebook page to see how she was doing in the effort to ditch the gas chamber. I didn’t see any celebratory posts, so I went looking for the original note in case the good news was buried in a comment. I couldn’t find it. Just to be sure, I clicked the link in my earlier post.

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Poof! Vanished is Lori Baxter’s vow to bury the gas chamber.

Good thing I had thought ahead and made a screen shot of it.

A Note from Lori Baxter by Sampson County Animal Shelter on SUnday, 24 June 2012 at 22 :02 Many of you may be surprised that I've agreed to accept this Interim Director position due to the fact that Sampson County Animal Shelter is a gassing fadty. Make no mistake, I am horrfied at the thought and am 150% behind its complete and utter destruction. The chamber itself is part of the reason I accepted this position, so I can get rd of it! The term euthanasia meanS "good death," and the gas chambers method of killin companion animals is hardly a humane form of euthanasia. This is not tolerable on my watch. However, it still exists, for the moment, killing near to 2,000 a year. I have arranged for a grant to bury it, never to have it be used again but it will take a bit of time. It takes time to get a more humane form of euthanasia into place. It takes time to put together a new way of doing things, a better plan, for the safety of the people and the humane treatment of animals. Gassing pets is an abomination in this day and age and WILL be rectfied, if it's the last thing I do. In the meanwhile, I NEED YOUR HELP! I need these animals to go to rescue as quickly as possible to avoid the use of that death chamber. The staff here has been using it for years and as it has been the ONLY resource to make needed space. Its use will go on until l such time as things are in place for it to be buried along with the thousands killed within its walls. This sheiter didn't have a FB page until 2 days ago. There has been virtually no rescue involvement, no networking the animals and very few local adoptions. Basically, animals were brougt here to be gassed. We KNOW there is a better way! I KNOW that together, we CAN make a difference in Sampson County! I have the full support of the County Manager to terminate the use of the gas chamber as soon as we can get things in order. In the meantime,let's show this county what animal rescue is all about!!! Please help network as many as you can! Find fosters and contact rescue groups to get them OUT! Please cross-post far and wide! Tell everyone you know! Interested rescue groups should email lbaxter@sampsonnC.com to express interest in partnering with Sampson County Animal Sheler. Thank you so much for all you do for the animals! Lori Baxter

Note Posted on Facebook By Lori Baxter on June 24, 2012, and deleted later.

Maybe the note vanished because she achieved the objective. It’s possible. (I mean, how long can it possibly take to get some syringes and Fatal-Plus shipped in?) So I posted to the Facebook page, asking if the gas chamber had been buried yet.

Poof. That went down the memory hole as well.

So, what’s happened to Lori Baxter’s vow to end the gassing of pets “if it’s the last thing I do”? Did she have her fingers crossed behind her back when she wrote that note? Maybe she figured saying “if it’s the last thing I do” gave her until the end of her natural lifetime to complete the task?

Meanwhile, animals are being gassed so that Lori Baxter can have space. Because her dream is to have rows of empty cages …

Lori Baxter sees her job as emptying cages, not saving animals

Lori Baxter sees her job as emptying cages, not saving animals

But judging by her actions as director at the Robeson County pound, she doesn’t care how she gets them. The Robeson pound killed 61 percent of the animals that came in during 2011, with a policy of maintaining half of the kennels empty at all times. Space is so important to Lori Baxter that she routinely chose death for dogs even when there was plenty of room for them to stay in the shelter.

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Filed under gas chamber, NC county/municipal pounds, Sampson County

Rescuers and adopters battle distemper spreading from NC pounds

A rescuer who pulled a dog from the Duplin County pound in early February ended up losing that dog, plus a litter of five pups she was fostering, to distemper. A dog adopted from Duplin County was boarded at a Triangle area kennel and another dog there soon came down with distemper, despite having been vaccinated. Before long, the kennel was forced to close for 30 days and 14 dogs were dead, including the kennel owner’s personal pets. A young Durham vet tech who pulled a dog to foster  from the Robeson County shelter, not knowing the shelter was in the midst of one of many distemper outbreaks, only managed to save the animal after spending thousands of dollars at NCSU vet school.

Canine distemper is a highly contagious airborne disease that kills nearly half of the adult dogs who come in contact with it and nearly 80-percent of puppies.  In family pets, the best prevention is vaccination, but stopping the spread in animal shelters requires a combination of vaccination, quarantine, isolation, disease recognition/diagnostic testing and environmental decontamination. In shelters that fail to follow these protocols, the disease can spread rapidly and leave the facility via adopted and rescued dogs before shelter managers realize they have an outbreak going on.

The Robeson County Shelter keeps HALF its 50 kennels empty at all times, meaning they routinely kill dogs even when there is plenty of space for them, because they say it “reduces disease outbreaks.” How is that working out for them?

Distemper Won't Leave Us...

The Robeson pound closed for a distemper outbreak on March 26, killing all the dogs who had the misfortune to be there. It had only just reopened on March 19 after the previous distemper outbreak, which cost the lives of at least 60 dogs. This comes a year after a large distemper outbreak at the Robeson pound caused it to be closed for two weeks of quarantine.

This pound has a long history of failed inspections, neglect allegations and suspicion of improper euthanasia, all of which have been extensively chronicled at YesBiscuit!. This record of shoddy standards notwithstanding, (now former) director Lori Baxter laid the blame for the distemper outbreak on “the public”: “This is 100 percent preventable, and if people do not start vaccinating their animals, it’s never going to end,” Baxter said, despite the fact that the Robeson pound itself does not regularly vaccinate upon intake the way any pound that wants to prevent the spread of distemper must.

Yes, people should vaccinate their pets against distemper. But since when have ALL the dogs that come into a rural pound been escaped or lost family pets? Since probably never. Countless animals that make it into rural pounds have either been stray for months or years or were born out in the rough and have never had a home. Every shelter manager should expect that animals coming into the facility may not have been vaccinated and have possibly been exposed to CDV (also carried by many common wild mammals), and take proper precautions. The best defenses against spreading the virus are to segregate new arrivals, maintain a clean facility and vaccinate every new animal upon arrival. The spread of distemper once it is inside a facility is the pound manager’s fault, not the public’s, and it is preventable.

Meanwhile, two counties away in Duplin, the outbreaks have been alternating between parvovirus and distemper, beginning in early December 2011. On December 5 a parvo outbreak was reported on Pet Friends of Duplin County’s Facebook page.  Although the Duplin pound manager Joe Newborn apparently knew of the outbreak, he continued to release dogs until announcing on December 18 that the pound would close that week to kill all dogs and sanitize.

Less than two weeks later, a rescuer posted to the PFDC page that she suspected  a distemper outbreak at the pound.  Dogs continued to be released from the Duplin facility however, and before long a few other participants on the PFDC page posted their suspicions of a distemper outbreak.

On Feb. 9 the Pet Friends organization (not the pound management) notified some rescuers of the outbreak, far too late for many.

After the outbreak was announced on the PFDC facebook page, many PFDC supporters raised funds to purchase vaccines. But they were never administered because according to County manager Mike Aldridge, nobody at the pound knew how to administer them. Never mind that I learned how just now by googling “How to give a distemper vaccination.” There is no requirement that shelter staff be certified or licensed to give these vaccines, and knowing this is part of Aldridge’s and Newborn’s jobs.

Then in March, parvo spread again. The Duplin pound closed on March 12, killed all the dogs, and then opened again and took in new dogs on March 13. Meanwhile, Aldridge knows the pound is dirty and unsantizable because of cracked floors (noted repeatedly over six years of inspections by NC Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services vets), but he has no plans to do anything at all about it. He told rescuer Kris Casey “I am not going to spend $15,000 when the whole shelter needs to be bulldozed.”

And surprise! Aldridge also blamed “the public” in a conversation with Casey: “The problem begins with the fact that Duplin is a ‘poor’ county and the first thing poor people do is get an animal and they can’t take care of them and end up turning them loose.” But is it the public’s fault that the Duplin pound has not only failed its last 5 NCDA&CS inspections, but has passed only 6 of the 22 inspections performed since November 2006?

In August 2010 the NCDA&CS issued a warning letter to Duplin County for failing to correct repeated sanitation violations and in October 2011 the county was assessed civil penalty of $1,000 for non-compliance with the state animal welfare statute. Yet the shelter continues to operate, continuing a cycle of disease that results in the deaths of hundreds of dogs monthly and sends infected dogs into other NC communities. Meanwhile Mike Aldridge blames the people who pay him a salary to make sure their county services run correctly.

If these outbreaks really were because of unvaccinated dogs, one would expect similar stories from pounds in surrounding counties, right? But the also “poor” counties that sit between Duplin and Robeson have not been affected by the recent distemper outbreaks. Both Bladen and Sampson are rural counties, the pounds have annual budgets similar to those in  Robeson and Duplin and they probably have a similar percentage of residents who fail to vaccinate for parvo and distemper. Bladen county pound had a distemper outbreak in early 2010,  and Sampson had one in 2010 and 2011. But neither shelter has been stuck in a constant cycle of contagion like the Duplin and Robeson pounds. Perhaps they are doing something to prevent it? Maybe Mike Aldridge should call over to Bladen County and get some advice.

Until Duplin and Robeson Counties bring in managers who actually care about saving the lives of animals in their pounds (and the communities that rescue and adopt from them), expect more of the same. Unfortunately, it’s the animals who will pay the most.

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Filed under Distemper, Duplin, NC county/municipal pounds, Robeson County